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How to Reset Your Career This Fall

Written by Meghan Jeffery

Whether you’re looking for a new job, trying to make the most of your current one or finding that elusive side hustle you’ve been longing for, the Fall is an ideal time to start. Why? We’re naturally conditioned to start fresh thanks to heading back-to-school for the first half of our lives, and watching the days get shorter somehow encourages us to get our shit together because #winteriscoming. Not going back to school? Here are a few ways to reset your career this fall.

Take a fall class 

Fall classes are the ultimate way to revamp your skill-set, add a new achievement to LinkedIn and start asking for that promotion you deserve. Career motivators aside: it’s a useful way to revisit your scholarly side and even sneak some networking opportunities in. When you’re surrounding yourself by classmates (and instructors/professors) who are interested in learning the same skills as you, you’re bound to meet someone who will keep you in mind when their company is hiring, or offer you some mentorship if you’re struggling with a work-related issue.

Set a meeting with your boss to discuss your #careergoals

Does your boss know what your dream job is? Or even what your dream role is? Perhaps you’ve been eying up a co-worker’s position, or wish you could be a part of that new project your company is taking on. Whatever it is, it’s important to let your voice be heard. Your boss is busy, and may not be noticing those subtle hints you keep dropping to work on a new project, or address a new challenge. If you don’t have a quarterly progress meeting already set up, try to get one in his or her schedule. Ensure you’re setting up the conversation to reflect that you also want what’s best for the company, and hopefully your #careergoals will align. If your boss doesn’t help support your goals—is that really someone you want to work for?

Take up a hobby (yes, outside of work)

Quite simply, hobbies allow us to release stress and focus on something that we’re interested in. Even when work gets busy or social engagements get to be too much, it’s still important to explore new challenges or interests outside of work. Don’t have enough time? Take up something that won’t consume too much time, or that you can pick up whenever you have a free moment. But remember—if you don’t choose something you actually like, it will start to seem like work. Explore new options, get to know new people, and find a hobby that’s aligned with your interests (and schedule).

Mentor someone

I’ve written about how to find a mentor, but what about offering your skills to someone else? Providing leadership and mentorship to junior staff on your team, or even family friends, can offer you a new outlook on your role and could even give you motivation to take the next leap in your career. Giving back is equally as important as reaching your goals, because it isn’t always easy starting out, and it’s important to stay humble about where you came from.

http://29secrets.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/08/29s_how-to-reset-your-career-this-fall-150x100.jpg Meghan Jeffery Wellness

Whether you’re looking for a new job, trying to make the most of your current one or finding that elusive side hustle you’ve been longing for, the Fall is an ideal time to start. Why? We’re naturally conditioned to start fresh thanks to heading back-to-school for the first half of our lives, and watching the days get shorter somehow encourages us to get our shit together because #winteriscoming. Not going back to school? Here are a few ways to reset your career this fall.

Take a fall class 

Fall classes are the ultimate way to revamp your skill-set, add a new achievement to LinkedIn and start asking for that promotion you deserve. Career motivators aside: it’s a useful way to revisit your scholarly side and even sneak some networking opportunities in. When you’re surrounding yourself by classmates (and instructors/professors) who are interested in learning the same skills as you, you’re bound to meet someone who will keep you in mind when their company is hiring, or offer you some mentorship if you’re struggling with a work-related issue.

Set a meeting with your boss to discuss your #careergoals

Does your boss know what your dream job is? Or even what your dream role is? Perhaps you’ve been eying up a co-worker’s position, or wish you could be a part of that new project your company is taking on. Whatever it is, it’s important to let your voice be heard. Your boss is busy, and may not be noticing those subtle hints you keep dropping to work on a new project, or address a new challenge. If you don’t have a quarterly progress meeting already set up, try to get one in his or her schedule. Ensure you’re setting up the conversation to reflect that you also want what’s best for the company, and hopefully your #careergoals will align. If your boss doesn’t help support your goals—is that really someone you want to work for?

Take up a hobby (yes, outside of work)

Quite simply, hobbies allow us to release stress and focus on something that we’re interested in. Even when work gets busy or social engagements get to be too much, it’s still important to explore new challenges or interests outside of work. Don’t have enough time? Take up something that won’t consume too much time, or that you can pick up whenever you have a free moment. But remember—if you don’t choose something you actually like, it will start to seem like work. Explore new options, get to know new people, and find a hobby that’s aligned with your interests (and schedule).

Mentor someone

I’ve written about how to find a mentor, but what about offering your skills to someone else? Providing leadership and mentorship to junior staff on your team, or even family friends, can offer you a new outlook on your role and could even give you motivation to take the next leap in your career. Giving back is equally as important as reaching your goals, because it isn’t always easy starting out, and it’s important to stay humble about where you came from.

Meghan Jeffery meghan.r.jeffery@gmail.com Author Meghan is a content and social media manager in Toronto, and loves sharing her passion for the digital sphere in her work. A globe trotter at heart, if she's not trolling online for a flight deal, she's scoping out the next best place to check out in Toronto. 29Secrets

About the author

Meghan Jeffery

Meghan is a content and social media manager in Toronto, and loves sharing her passion for the digital sphere in her work. A globe trotter at heart, if she's not trolling online for a flight deal, she's scoping out the next best place to check out in Toronto.

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