<img src="http://b.scorecardresearch.com/p?c1=2&c2=15350591&cv=2.0&cj=1" /> Spring 2012 Fashion: Silhouettes For Spring - 29Secrets

Spring 2012 Fashion: Silhouettes For Spring

Written by Anne T. Donahue

The shapes to take on this season

Here are the silhouettes to watch for spring, and how you can pick the one that’s best for you.

Art Deco influence
1920s flapper-inspired dresses are a major part of the season, and while designers like Marc Jacobs maintained traditional feminine silhouettes, loose-fitting styles made an impact. The same goes for the 1960s: Twiggy-inspired dresses were seen in bright, bold colours and are perfect for tall, thin figures. Since short hemlines and short sleeves help balance the loose-fitting style, the look is still flattering – provided you’re not too curvy.

Hourglass
However, if you’re curvy, look no further. Thanks to peplum styles and form-fitting dresses, the hourglass figure makes a triumphant return in spring 2012. Whether through high-waisted pencil skirts or ‘50s print dresses (like Carolina Herrera’s spring collection), the waist and chest are defined to create a flattering, feminine look. And when in doubt, think Joan Halloway: in time for Mad Men’s premiere, the character’s classic style will help remind you of the hourglass’ fashion power.

Streamlined
It’s another year for gentleman-inspired fashion, so the sleek, streamlined silhouette is back for spring 2012. Just remember that there’s a difference between the boxy look of ‘20s and ‘60s dresses and the loose-fitting jackets and trousers seen in Ralph Lauren’s collection. However, to avoid losing yourself in metres of fabric, keep a crisp white blouse tucked in. That way, you’re still creating some definition despite the largeness of your blazer and pants.

A-line
True, an A-line skirt or tea dress arguably creates an hourglass silhouette, but in terms of being body-hugging or showing off curves, the two could not be more different. With a skirt and fitted blouse, a more “classic” silhouette is created and offers room for error if necessary. (Read: your waist is still defined, but you don’t necessarily need Spanx.) However, make sure this silhouette for spring hits right at the waist – too high will create shapelessness that nobody deserves.

Sympatico Image

rl_-_150_x_150.jpg

http://29secrets.com/wp-content/uploads/rl_-_300_x_400-150x150.jpg Anne T. Donahue Style ,,,,,,

Here are the silhouettes to watch for spring, and how you can pick the one that’s best for you.

Art Deco influence
1920s flapper-inspired dresses are a major part of the season, and while designers like Marc Jacobs maintained traditional feminine silhouettes, loose-fitting styles made an impact. The same goes for the 1960s: Twiggy-inspired dresses were seen in bright, bold colours and are perfect for tall, thin figures. Since short hemlines and short sleeves help balance the loose-fitting style, the look is still flattering – provided you’re not too curvy.

Hourglass
However, if you’re curvy, look no further. Thanks to peplum styles and form-fitting dresses, the hourglass figure makes a triumphant return in spring 2012. Whether through high-waisted pencil skirts or ‘50s print dresses (like Carolina Herrera’s spring collection), the waist and chest are defined to create a flattering, feminine look. And when in doubt, think Joan Halloway: in time for Mad Men’s premiere, the character’s classic style will help remind you of the hourglass’ fashion power.

Streamlined
It’s another year for gentleman-inspired fashion, so the sleek, streamlined silhouette is back for spring 2012. Just remember that there’s a difference between the boxy look of ‘20s and ‘60s dresses and the loose-fitting jackets and trousers seen in Ralph Lauren’s collection. However, to avoid losing yourself in metres of fabric, keep a crisp white blouse tucked in. That way, you’re still creating some definition despite the largeness of your blazer and pants.

A-line
True, an A-line skirt or tea dress arguably creates an hourglass silhouette, but in terms of being body-hugging or showing off curves, the two could not be more different. With a skirt and fitted blouse, a more “classic” silhouette is created and offers room for error if necessary. (Read: your waist is still defined, but you don’t necessarily need Spanx.) However, make sure this silhouette for spring hits right at the waist – too high will create shapelessness that nobody deserves.

Sympatico Image

rl_-_150_x_150.jpg

annetdonahue@gmail.com Author 29Secrets

About the author

Anne T. Donahue

Leave a Comment